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Lent

Sunday 10 March – Lent 1

In today’s Lenten reflection the Most Rev Mark Strange, Bishop of Moray, Ross & Caithness and Primus of the Scottish Episcopal Church reflects on stained glass windows in Holy Trinity Church, Elgin depicting Jesus praying on the Mount of Olives.

Lenten Reflections 2019 – Jesus on the Mount of Olives

In today’s Lenten reflection the Most Rev Mark Strange, Bishop of Moray, Ross & Caithness and Primus of the Scottish Episcopal Church reflects on stained glass windows in Holy Trinity Church, Elgin depicting Jesus praying on the Mount of Olives.-“In this image we see Jesus kneeling in prayer: “Father, if you are willing, take this cup from me; yet not my will, but yours be done.” In Lent we are reminded of our common humanity. We confess, as Jesus does, that to live as God wishes us to live is hard. And we pray, as Jesus did for the strength to live as God wills us. And God forgives. And asks us simply that we try again.”

Posted by United Diocese of Moray, Ross and Caithness on Sunday, 10 March 2019

 

 

Ash Wednesday

The Rt Rev Kevin Pearson, Bishop of Argyll & The Isles reflects on Ash Wednesday in the first of our Lenten video series.

Ash Wednesday

The Rt Rev Kevin Pearson, Bishop of Argyll & The Isles reflects on Ash Wednesday in the first of our Lenten video series.Each Sunday in Lent, and every day throughout Holy Week there will be a new video from one of the Dioceses of the Scottish Episcopal Church with reflections and prayers on the imagery and art of Lent.-Ash Wednesday is a day of hope because the ash is made by burning the palm crosses we received last Palm Sunday. It is as if the hopes and ambitions, desires, longings and good resolutions of almost a year are consumed and leave only Ash. And yet the ashes come from a cross of palm which reminds us that Jesus took up his cross to prove God is with us, even amidst what appears the debris of our lives. God is with us as we think in Lent of Jesus carrying his Cross to prove God understands what it’s like to be you, and God understands what it’s like to be me. The Ash may be negative but the action of the priest, tracing the cross on my forehead, is positive. The Cross is traced in exactly the same place as the cross was traced at my baptism. Here on Ash Wednesday I can take the Cross on my forehead as a positive because it is a reminder of my baptism, no matter how young, or how old. I take up the cross on my forehead as a sign that the holy spirit is calling from me my best effort to be more like Jesus in thought and deed this Lent. To show the love of God in my life. Love, that at Easter we see never dies, because resurrection proves to us, even in the debris of our lives, all in the end is harvest. Happy Lent!

Posted by Scottish Episcopal Church on Wednesday, 6 March 2019

 

 

 

 

Welcome to

All Saints Lockerbie

You come and you visit our website and we have no idea if you are 5,000 kilometres away or in the next street. Somewhere in between, probably. Well, we are a small but devoted congregation and although I say it myself, I believe we are friendly and welcoming. I think one of the special characteristics of our faith is that if you go to church in a strange place, you should be able to say that you have a ready made body of friends or at least, potential friends in that Christian community. So if you are looking for somewhere to worship God in the Anglican style, in a place where you will be welcomed, be it passing through on holiday, or because you live in this part of Annandale, do come and join us for our main service at 11.15 on Sunday morning, we would love to see you.

John Macleod.

 

Service times are as follows:
Sunday –  11.15 am Sung Eucharist,
Thursday – 4 pm Evening Prayer with discussion and Holy Communion

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